All Weather Backing System Review

 

All Weather Backing System

All Weather Backing System

 In 2010 I have been introduced to a new betting system, and tipping service, called All Weather Backing System.

This is clearly one of the ‘does what it says on the tin’ type products, which is great inasmuch as you know what it’s supposed to be… an All-Weather… Backing… System… but you still don’t know whether it’s any good.

Here’s where I come in. I’ve had a copy for a couple of weeks now, and I’ve run the rules through various horse racing databases to get a feel for a) how accurate the results are, and b) how likely the system is to continue to generate profits to the claimed levels.

Therefore, before I go any further, I need to highlight that this review is based upon historical data and not, to-date, on a ‘live’ system review.

So let me tell you a bit more about All Weather Backing System.

The system manual is completely and utterly fluff-free, meaning it weighs in at a featherweight four pages only. But don’t be fooled by that. After all, most business gurus I listen to reckon you should be able to write an entire business strategy on the back of a napkin!

What this does mean however is that there are no detailed walk-through’s of how to identify a qualifying horse, or anything like that.

In fact, the manual consists of an explanation of the ten simple rules; a commentary on WHY the rules have been added; and, a line or two on staking, which runs as far as to suggest a 30 point bank and level stakes. Personally, I’d probably use a 50 point bank, and I might be tempted to use a very light incremental approach, but using the author’s suggestions would have served you well historically.

But, as we all know, history belongs in history books. So what of the future, and who the hell is the author anyway?

Well, I’ve looked at the rules, and I’m happy that they’re all predicated on sound logic, which is a pleasant change in itself. The strike rate is somewhere between 22 and 25%, which means you can expect some losing runs. The counter-argument is that winners come in packages up to 10/1 and, of course, if you’re using the ol’ Betfair machine, you’ll get more than the bookies’ price for your investments.

The system is authored by a chap called Sam McCallon. You may or may not know Sam through his systems review website, onlineracingreview.com. He’s been going for about two and a half years now, and in that time I’ve spoken with him regularly on email. In short, he’s a guy I know and trust as honest and up to his word.

His All Weather Backing System reckons to have around 125 bets a year, and most of these are struck – unsurprisingly – between Deecember and March, the ‘real’ all weather flat racing season. In that regard, All Weather Backing System makes for an excellent portfolio addition.

The number of qualifiers should ramp up a fair bit in the next few weeks, which means now is the best time to take advantage of Sam’s 30 day no quibble refund policy. To quote the young man himself, “If however within the first 30 days of using this system you don’t for whatever reason feel that it represents value for money then I will offer you a prompt no hassle refund.”

Can’t say fairer than that?

All Weather Backing System comes in a pdf format and costs a one off payment of £45. For this you get the manual via a download link, PLUS access to the daily qualifiers each day for no extra charge. This service will run from now until the end of October next year. This is great news if you’re not sure about the rules, or you simply don’t have the time / can’t be bothered to find the selections (either of these are acceptable reasons!)

In summary, I have run the All Weather Backing System rules through my database, and the results quoted are correct. Going forwards, this little system should continue to add ballast to your betting portfolio through the winter months. And you can try it out risk-free from a guy I know and trust.

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