Little Acorns Review 2010

LITTLE ACORNS FINAL REVIEW:

The Little Acorns system is a system which has been around for several years and is a laying system for odds on favourites. The system comes as a PDF download which enables you to start using it almost immediately.

There are several staking plans included and for the system trial I stuck to the first one which is a simple Fibonacci type system.

The closer to race time you can check the odds the better chance of finding selections.

The system costs £97 and comes with a 30 day money back guarantee.

Requirements,

You will need access to the betting exchange and the Racing Post website.

The System

The system is all about betting on odds on favourites to lose. It can be used on all race types and any amount of runners in the UK. There are really two simple criteria to check which take approximately 20 – 30 minutes a day. There is an extra filter if you wish to be ultra cautious but I did not use this in the trial.The system comes with recommended staking plans which are designed to recover any losses, for the trial I used the first recommended plan.

The trial

The trial started quite well and then we hit the inevitable losing streak ( meaning the favourites were winning ). Using the advised staking plan we quickly lost all of our initial profit and were playing catch-up from thereon in.

The author of the system says he has made a profit every year since the system was devised and that in his opinion the reason people fail is down to the following. ( His words as in the PDF )

  1. They are NOT following it correctly
  2. They give up or question the formula if encountering a losing run of ‘ 8 ‘ or more ( A losing run of 8 seems to be the psychological barrier where punters start to lose their nerve).
  3. They expect too much too quick and start with big stakes.

Well lets take point 2, following the advised staking plan then  if you have 8 losing bets on the trot ( I had 9 ) then by the ninth race you will already have bet a total of 54 times your stake  for that sequence and your next bet is a further 34 times your stake so if, or in my case when that loses and you go back to one times your stake you are playing catch up to the tune of whatever odds prices you get times 88 so I can see why people would start to question the formula. Eg if you take 1.7 as average losing odds at £10 per lay,  you would lose £616. So even if you had a good run before you hit this then it is still pretty damaging.

The overall results of the trial are as follows:

Selections   83

Winning Bets  41

Losing Bets  42

Profit / Loss to £10 Stakes        LOSS of £334.80

Summary

I have no doubt there will be long profitable periods with this system but personally I believe that the risk of wiping profits out quickly outweighs the possible reward. To ensure you got in on all selections you would have to monitor each race as odds do fluctuate especially close to the off.

I believe if you gave this to five different people they would get five different results as it would depend on what time you check the races and what odds you took.

As it stands I personally found this system to be dangerous as with most systems using this type of chase your loss staking plans.

In fairness the author does suggest using £2 stakes to start and then move up as your bank grows. He says a losing sequence of 9 would probably occur once in 15/18 months. He also suggests a starting bank of 178 times your stake so that taking the average losing odds the system could stand over 2 ½ losing sequences before wiping out your bank.

The other staking system which basically is adding your losses to your stake until you win is another which is not for the faint hearted, as though obviously you will get a winner sometime you can still end up laying out high stakes to just  achieve getting your money back.

My personal view is that using these types of staking plans is a recipe for disaster with the risks far outweighing the potential rewards. Whilst statistics may prove more odds on favourites lose than win they are often not odds on without reason and there will be many times when you will be risking multiples of your stake, and even though you may not hit the dreaded 9 losing bets on the trot, it won’t bode well for those of a nervous disposition.

The Little Acorns system would not be suitable for those unable to monitor the races shortly before the off as many selections qualify close to the start of the race. Over the trial the average comes out at just over 2 races per day, with the highest day having 5 selections and some days having none.

- Gareth

Little Acorns Review 2010, 7.3 out of 10 based on 3 ratings