Monday Musings: Terrific Derby Pour Moi!

Derby winner, Pour Moi, sired Derby winner, Wings Of Eagles. Tony's guv'nor is delighted

Derby winner, Pour Moi, sired Derby winner, Wings Of Eagles. Tony's guv'nor is delighted

It is very easy to understand the appeal of horserace ownership, writes Tony Stafford. Most often, men or less frequently women that have done well in their chosen occupation, find attractive the thought of competing with the giants of the sport, the Maktoums, Juddmonte, the Qataris and, above all, Coolmore.

Often they will have enjoyed going racing with horse-owning friends, and even betting. Upon taking the plunge, they are immediately faced with the conundrum, to buy or breed? As prices at the upper end have continued to rise over recent years – the effect intensified by that latter Qatari influence, rewarded yesterday after they had bought into Brametot, the Prix du Jockey Club winner - some existing owners have felt compelled to move into breeding.

I must declare an interest at this point. Regular readers will know of my working relationship with high-profile lawyer and punching-above-his-weight owner, Raymond Tooth. He is in precisely that nether-land where yearlings you might want cost fortunes, and stallions you might choose for your mares are often excessively-priced.

Over recent years, the programme, guided by Rachael and Richard Kempster at Kinsale stud in Shropshire, has developed steadily. Major winners have not been too evident, but from minor- winning mare, Lawyers Choice, first Dutch Art Dealer and then the talented Dutch Law (both by Dutch Art) who made almost £90,000 on the track and afterwards £150k at the autumn sales, suggest Ray’s on the right path.

Every year we try to anticipate what might prove a hidden jewel among stallions – a putative Galileo hiding in the back sheds of Coolmore, Juddmonte, or own regular favourites, Cheveley Park and Newsells Park studs.

Dutch Art was our pick when he was covering for one-sixth of his peak figure a few years later, and in Mayson and now Garswood, we’re hoping that connection with Cheveley Park will continue to thrive.

Down in Royston, we liked Mount Nelson, now sold for a jumps stallion, but sire of a promising unraced colt called Nelson River at Clive Cox’s, and also the consistent Equiano. The other Newsells Park stallion is Nathaniel, who was available at around £20,000 for his first few crops.

We also tried Coolmore, but have been a little unlucky there so far, one mare slipping a foal in the autumn before we could ascertain whether we’d go back to St Leger winner Kingston Hill. Another didn’t get in foal, and so from two years’ patronage there, we have three youngsters, two yearlings and a foal, all by one stallion.

Imagine how many sires there are to pick from. Massive books with hundreds of pages and portraits assail the would-be small or even hobby breeder, all with the probably-unrealistic hope of competing at a high level. Why else would Richard Aylwood want to run his home-bred filly Diore Lia as a 1,000-1 shot in Saturday’s Investec Derby?

Well he might say he’d paid his full entry fee and also €6,000 to send her mother to Coolmore to be covered by four-time Gold Cup hero Yeats. True she’d been rolled over in two maidens for Jane Chapple-Hyam; and that trainer’s reluctance to let her run with an apprentice rider, who had just a single riding win to her credit in Ireland years ago, caused the filly’s removal to John Jenkins, down the road from Newsells Park.

Plenty has been said of the BHA’s refusal to allow Gina Mangan to ride. The more experienced Paddy Pilley was then due to take over but happily, from where I sit anyway, a muscle problem prevented Diore Lia from lining up at Epsom.

Yeats was immediately earmarked for the NH stallion job after his epic Flat-race career and as time goes by he’ll get plenty of dual-purpose horses. Derby winners, though never Galileo, often make an average start before going through the gears or more likely go onto the NH sire route.

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In a year when Aidan O’Brien has won five of the six English and Irish Classics to be run to date, the thought of being able to go to a stud farm and look at a youngster from a Classic-producing stallion and contemplate what might happen in the near future would be a cheery prospect indeed.

Raymond Tooth has seven yearlings, but because of the death of one of his younger mares and the slipping of a foal I mentioned, just five live foals. That makes 12 in all. I can tell you that 41% of them, therefore five of the 12, are sons or daughters of stallions that have produced England Classic winners during 2017. We were never going to get anywhere near Galileo, responsible for this spring’s two dual Guineas winners Churchill and Winter, but did use Nathaniel and Pour Moi.

Enable, from the first crop of Galileo’s son Nathaniel, easily beat Galileo filly and 1,000 Guineas runner-up Rhododendron in Friday’s Oaks. Not only was Enable from Nathaniel’s first crop, it also means he has beaten his superior racetrack contemporary, Frankel, to a first European Classic win, although the fellow Galileo product already has a Japanese Classic to his credit.

The 40-1 Wings Of Eagles, who came through late to deny Cliffs Of Moher, the Ballydoyle/Coolmore first string, ridden by Ryan Moore, is from only the second crop of Pour Moi, a son of the late Montjeu, the other big Derby winning producer from Coolmore in recent times.

In that regard, Pour Moi has in common with Galileo that he is a Derby winner who produced a Derby winner from his second crop: in Galileo’s case, New Approach. Unlike Galileo, Pour Moi had been seconded to NH duties this year after some disappointing results, but no doubt he’ll be back from his “loan” spell in the Championship and in Premier League action again in 2018.

Wings of Eagles’ starting-price was extraordinary, given he could easily have won the Chester Vase had the race worked out a little more favourably and had Seamus Heffernan been a little less complacent in his pursuit of Ryan Moore on Venice Beach.

Venice Beach, who on Saturday finished twelfth, was only a 12-1 shot, but probably the fact that Heffernan settled for Capri, with heavy rain forecast at the time the jockey plans were firmed up, and the appearance of Padraig Beggy on Wings Of Eagles caused the lack of interest. As the song, <with apologies to “Living next door to Alice”>, says: “Beggy? Who the xxxx is Beggy?”

Well Beggy, we discovered, was a former Irish export to Australia who was banned after taking “certain substances”. When he returned without a licence, friends managed to get O’Brien to take him on as a work rider at Ballydoyle and that most loyal of men told him he’d get his chance if he worked hard. Three years on, he did, and how well did he take it? As for the Derby winner, he might have a battle in the Irish Derby, but I reckon he’s a dish for the St Leger.

Back to Ray and why we went to Pour Moi. As I said, he was a Derby-winning son of Montjeu, another of whose sons Motivator produced Treve, from the Anabaa mare, Trevise. We had a daughter of Anabaa in the dual French winner, Ms Cordelia, but it was only by a few days that she survived worsening foot problems, to foal to Pour Moi.

Instead of being able to nurture her second foal, she had to be put down, so the resulting filly was raised, with the patient care of all at Kinsale, by a 14hh Welsh cob foster mother, who produced a fountain of milk, once she had been “conned” into thinking this was her own “baby”. Let’s hope the effort was worthwhile and Ray gets his own version of Treve!

- Tony Stafford

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