Travel Headaches about in today's Monday Musings

Monday Musings: Travel Headaches

What’s an acceptable time for an aircraft delay, asks Tony Stafford. Mrs S is returning tonight from an unexpected but necessary trip to Moscow and her ETA at Heathrow Terminal 5 is approximately identical to the anticipated arrival through Tattersalls Park Paddocks sales ring of the boss’s Stanhope.

So is it better to wish for baggage handlers or flight controllers to contrive an hour’s go-slow or hope that the 114 horses already scheduled to miss their date with destiny at Newmarket before lot 410 struts his stuff are supplemented still further?

Transport problems have been a feature of the past 24 hours and the small plane taking a number of jockeys and other interested parties to Paris for the two Criterium Group 1 races at Saint-Cloud had a quicker turn-around than was initially feared when the meeting was delayed and then abandoned with just a single claiming race concluded.

Cambridge Airport does not permit landings after dark, so on this first day of GMT after the clocks went back, there were some anxious moments as jockeys anticipated landing at Stansted with their cars languishing in the Cambridge car park. Depending on your point of view, all was well in the end, apart from the French owners’ and trainers’ protest which halted the action.

In the Doncaster press room on Saturday, I had a chat with Marcus Townend of the Daily Mail and the Mirror’s Dave Yates, who both had as much intention of going to France as going to the Moon. “It has to be today”, said Yates, talking of the Bobby Frankel Group 1 record that Aidan O’Brien was to break later in the day. “Then it’ll be a great story. If it goes on until tomorrow, it’s just a footnote”. Wise words, Dave.

Of course, the two journalists will have been busy yesterday packing for that highly desirable journalistic “tick” in San Diego for next weekend’s Breeders’ Cup. Wish I could be there, lads. One friend, Andrew Pasfield, would have shared in the general irritation at the abandonment of the mile and a quarter Criterium de Saint-Cloud race. Luminate, the unbeaten Highclere-owned filly in which he has a share, was thought to be the one feasible impediment to another O’Brien win.

Andrew, who was also in the Melody syndicate years back, had asked in the days leading up to the race whether I knew what Aidan’s team was likely to be. When it became a strong-looking quartet including Nelson, Delano Roosevelt and Newmarket ten furlong winner Kew Gardens, he feared the worst, but the actual outcome was even more devastating.

Andrew was unable to be in Paris as his flight to San Diego was timed – in the manner of Mrs S’s inconvenient scheduling – to leave London as the horses were due to arrive at the start at Saint-Cloud.

The other Criterium, the International, has been cut to seven furlongs from the one mile trip over which the boss’s French Fifteen won six years ago. Highclere were out in force that day, too, cheering on Bonfire, who got going late and finished third. They and many observers thought themselves unlucky, but it was hard to deny the winner, who’d come from even further back under Thierry Thulliez.

There was an airport story involved there also as French Fifteen’s trainer Nicolas Clement had not expected to run the colt in the race when he arranged a promotional trip to China. So he was still in the departure lounge at the airport – not sure which city – prior to his return home when FF was galloping to victory.

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My own travel plans that day were more than fraught. I’d arranged with my pal Roger Hales, Mr Reliable to you, to drive me and he was to meet me in the car park outside the house. At 5 a.m. I called to check he’d got there and received the rather unexpected news that he was 40 miles away on the side of the M11, broken down and with no credit on his phone – he was getting that corrected the following day!

So instead of having a bit of a snooze on the way over I had to drive and when we won, needed to enlist the help of a most obliging young lady from the Saint-Cloud office to lug the massive and very handsome trophy back to the car. Several hours and strictly no celebratory drinks later, said trophy was delivered to the boss’s house where it remains on proud display to this day.

French Fifteen, very sensibly, was sold a few days later and went on to finish inches behind Camelot in the following year’s 2,000 Guineas. He had his first crop runners this year and has had only a handful of winners, including one at the provincial track of Agen yesterday, over an extended nine furlongs.

It appears they share the characteristics of French Kiss, Ray’s home-bred colt and the only representative of his sire to have run in the UK – three runs unplaced with the maybe optimistic view that he might win next year, but clearly over a trip.

Camelot looked to have made a slow enough start to his stud career, but there’s been a flurry of talented winners lately. While the son of Montjeu might never be a Galileo, he’s certainly looking a more than decent prospect. How it must have irritated the Coolmore team when he came up just short in the St Leger- especially after the involvement of the winner Encke in the Godolphin “steroids” Al Zarooni scandal the following year. Otherwise he would have matched his illustrious Ballydoyle predecessor Nijinsky with a Triple Crown.

Maybe Saxon Warrior has the tools for such an achievement. He certainly showed all of speed, stamina and determination – the minimum triple requirement for mile, 12 and 14.6 furlong superiority – in winning the Racing Post Trophy on Saturday.

The timing of the turning back of the clocks gave Alan Spence the opportunity to win the first race of winter at Aintree with his £205k purchase On The Blind Side, who outbattled an 80-1 shot in a debut victory the owner described as “perfect”. The 2-1 about what the stable believed to be a certainty apparently was acceptable, too.

One of Alan’s more pressing decisions, following the multi-million sale of Profitable to Godolphin last year, was which of the many offers on the table to accept for Priceless, his other top Clive Cox-trained sprinter. The last I heard, he was favouring a possible foal-share deal involving Dubawi. With John Ferguson out of the picture, Darley better get a decent negotiator involved. Once Alan concludes that deal, he’ll be offering his services to Mrs May and David Davis to sort Brexit. They could do worse than take him up on it.

- TS

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1 reply
  1. patony123 says:

    Absolutely no mention of A Obriens achievement on BBC sports news on Saturday evening. Begs the question does British racing have any idea how to market its product

    Reply

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