Tag Archive for: Tom Marquand

Relief Rally forced to miss Cheveley Park assignment

Relief Rally will miss the Juddmonte Cheveley Park Stakes at Newmarket on Saturday due to a bad scope.

The William Haggas-trained two-year-old has proven a real money spinner for owners Simon Munir and Isaac Souede, better known for their National Hunt acquisitions.

After scoring at Windsor and Salisbury, Relief Rally went down by just a nose to Crimson Advocate in the Queen Mary at Royal Ascot before landing a valuable sales race at Newbury in a convincing manner.

Last time out, she took a step up in trip to six furlongs in her stride when beating Aidan O’Brien’s reopposing Cherry Blossom in the Group Two Lowther Stakes at York.

A crack at Group One glory was next up, but will now have to wait. Munir wrote on X (formerly Twitter): “Needless to say we are all very disappointed that Relief Rally scoped badly and is now a non-runner for the Cheveley Park Stakes tomorrow.”

Cherry Blossom has since done the value of the Lowther form no harm by picking up over €240,000 for finishing second of 23 in the Goffs Million at the Curragh, albeit beaten six lengths by One Look.

Soprano has performed consistently well in good company without quite adding to a debut success at this course.

George Boughey’s filly has been placed three times at Group Three level, in the Albany at Royal Ascot, the Sweet Solera on the July course here and the Dick Poole at Salisbury, when having to recover from fluffing her start and getting detached early on.

On the decision to run in this contest rather than Friday’s Rockfel Stakes, Boughey said: “I think staying at six furlongs is right. She is a strong stayer over that trip and she loves the track.

“There can be a speed influence in the Rockfel, but it looked like there are some stouter pedigrees in the Rockfel this year and I didn’t want her getting outstayed over seven furlongs by taking on horses that will stay a mile. We wanted to use her stamina over shorter.

“It was a massive effort for her to finish third at Salisbury given how she started the race. I think if the race was 50 yards longer, she would have nearly been in front. She certainly deserves her place in the line-up on Saturday.”

Jasna’s Secret bids to follow in the footsteps of some illustrious past French victors such as Ma Biche, Ravinella, Special Duty, Natagora and most recently Vorda in 2013.

She was snapped up by the shrewd Wathnan Racing recruitment team after completing a Deauville double in a valuable sales race for Carlos and Yann Lerner last month, when comfortably accounting for two-time winner Zorken.

Albany winner Porta Fortuna returns to the UK for Donnacha O’Brien, having since been placed twice in Group One company at the Curragh.

The daughter of Caravaggio was second to Bucanero Fuerte in the Phoenix Stakes and dead-heated for third behind Fallen Angel in the Moyglare on Irish Champions Festival weekend.

O’Brien said: “She is in good form, but obviously it is a very good race. There are four or fives horses there with very similar ratings.

“If we get a nice run and a bit of luck, hopefully she will run a big race.

“We are (dropping in trip), but I think she has no problem six or seven (furlongs) and she is back on a bit of nice ground so that will help too.”

Marquand: Relief Rally is right at home over six furlongs

Tom Marquand is backing Relief Rally to continue her excellent run of form in the Juddmonte Cheveley Park Stakes over six furlongs at Newmarket on Saturday.

The William Haggas-trained two-year-old has proven a real money spinner for owners Simon Munir and Isaac Souede, better known for their National Hunt acquisitions.

After scoring at Windsor and Salisbury, Relief Rally went down by just a nose to Crimson Advocate in the Queen Mary at Royal Ascot before landing a valuable sales race at Newbury in a convincing manner.

Last time out, she took a step up in trip to six furlongs in her stride when beating Aidan O’Brien’s reopposing Cherry Blossom in the Group Two Lowther Stakes at York.

A crack at Group One glory is next up and Marquand is delighted to maintain their ever-present partnership.

“At Windsor, she showed bags of speed and seemed really straightforward and sharp,” said the jockey. “I was a big fan of her that day.

“She has taken big steps forward with each of her runs and she was unfortunate not to win at Ascot, but she has shown a high level of form on those festival meeting cards.

“I was really looking forward to riding her over six furlongs to be honest with you at York. Over five, you had to give her that chance to fill up and then she would really rocket home.

“I was keen to jump on her over six furlongs as I thought it would suit her so well and she proved us right.”

Cherry Blossom has since done the value of that form no harm by picking up over €240,000 for finishing second of 23 in the Goffs Million at the Curragh, albeit beaten six lengths by One Look.

Soprano has performed consistently well in good company without quite adding to a debut success at this course.

George Boughey’s filly has been placed three times at Group Three level, in the Albany at Royal Ascot, the Sweet Solera on the July course here and the Dick Poole at Salisbury, when having to recover from fluffing her start and getting detached early on.

On the decision to run in this contest rather than Friday’s Rockfel Stakes, Boughey said: “I think staying at six furlongs is right. She is a strong stayer over that trip and she loves the track.

“There can be a speed influence in the Rockfel, but it looked like there are some stouter pedigrees in the Rockfel this year and I didn’t want her getting outstayed over seven furlongs by taking on horses that will stay a mile. We wanted to use her stamina over shorter.

“It was a massive effort for her to finish third at Salisbury given how she started the race. I think if the race was 50 yards longer, she would have nearly been in front. She certainly deserves her place in the line-up on Saturday.”

Jasna’s Secret bids to follow in the footsteps of some illustrious past French victors such as Ma Biche, Ravinella, Special Duty, Natagora and most recently Vorda in 2013.

She was snapped up by the shrewd Wathnan Racing recruitment team after completing a Deauville double in a valuable sales race for Carlos and Yann Lerner last month, when comfortably accounting for two-time winner Zorken.

Albany winner Porta Fortuna returns to the UK for Donnacha O’Brien, having since been placed twice in Group One company at the Curragh.

The daughter of Caravaggio was second to Bucanero Fuerte in the Phoenix Stakes and dead-heated for third behind Fallen Angel in the Moyglare on Irish Champions Festival weekend.

Marquand eyeing Group One double at Newmarket

Tom Marquand has his sights set on what would be a memorable Group One double at Newmarket this weekend.

The prolific Relief Rally takes her chance in the Juddmonte Cheveley Park Stakes, followed soon after by Lake Forest in the Middle Park.

Both juveniles are trained by William Haggas and both are fresh from Group-race victories at the Ebor meeting, where Relief Rally landed the Lowther Stakes and Lake Forest was a slightly more surprising winner of the Gimcrack.

Their big-race jockey said: “Relief Rally has been foot-perfect all season. She is a little battler and has the ability to go with it which is great. I’m looking forward to the weekend as it would be her big opportunity to get a well-deserved Group One on the board.

Relief Rally (left) on the way to victory at York
Relief Rally (left) on the way to victory at York (Mike Egerton/PA)

“Realistically, she probably has to take another little step forward as there are other fillies who will be progressing at the end of the year, but it is a step, not a leap. 

“She has been super versatile everywhere we have gone with her. The way she has done everything else I can’t imagine the track will be a problem. If she takes a small step forward she should be putting up a big performance and that should be enough to win.”

He added: “If she does train on it would be absolutely fantastic as she has not had a killer year where you have emptied the tank.

“She has had every opportunity to have some big dances, and this would be the biggest of them all. 

“With fast two-year-olds you have to enjoy them in the moment and ultimately she has given us a great season. 

“If it backs up to nothing else then so be it, but you can always look back with great fondness as there are not many that can go to those big festival meetings and perform as well as she has.”

In contrast to Relief Rally obliging as the 2-1 favourite at York, Lake Forest was sent on his way at 16-1 for the Gimcrack, having been beaten at 1-3 previously at Newmarket.

Tom Marquand returns victorious aboard Lake Forest
Tom Marquand returns victorious aboard Lake Forest (Simon Marper/PA)

Marquand said: “He flashed what he could do up at Haydock on his first start and the July Stakes at Newmarket was similar.

“Getting beat in the novice was the curveball that probably made him completely unfancied in the Gimcrack, but if you went back to that July Stakes form, you probably had to think he was not too far away from having a really good shout in it. 

“It is going to be an extremely tough race and there are those horses that are proven at the top level already, but he is a Gimcrack winner, and you have to be a pretty good horse to do that and hopefully he can continue on that path.”

Before Saturday, Marquand has a high-profile ride to look forward to on Friday with the return of Maljoom in the Al Basti Equiworld, Dubai Joel Stakes.

The Caravaggio colt has not been seen since finishing an unlucky fourth in last year’s St James’s Palace Stakes at Royal Ascot.

“It is great to have Maljoom back on a racecourse. He was an extremely exciting horse but didn’t have things go his way and unfortunately he found a few bumps in the road,” he said.

Maljoom remains a high-class prospect despite a long absence
Maljoom remains a high-class prospect despite a long absence (John Walton/PA)

“I jumped on him the other morning and he felt great. He has been off the track for a long time and you worry he might be a bit rusty, but he feels and looks great and everyone is happy with him.

“Hopefully he can make a good reappearance and show us what he showed before and get back on the right road.

“William had a couple of options for him, but he chose this for a reason, and it looks a good starting place. Hopefully it will be a good gauge as to where he is and what we do in the future with him.

“Fingers crossed this next chapter in his book can be a bit longer than the last one and he can have a clear run at it all.”

Marquand fully focused ahead of Desert Hero’s St Leger date

Tom Marquand is concentrating on the result rather than the occasion ahead of his bid to carry the royal colours to Classic glory in the Betfred St Leger at Doncaster.

It is 46 years since Dunfermline provided the late Queen with the last of her five British Classic wins in the Town Moor showpiece and optimism is high that Desert Hero can end the long wait for another victory by adding his name to the roll of honour on Saturday.

The William Haggas-trained colt brought the house down after giving the newly-crowned King and Queen their first taste of Royal Ascot success in the King George V Stakes in June and he has since enhanced his Leger claims by landing the Gordon Stakes at Goodwood.

Marquand has ridden multiple Group One winners at home and abroad, including a first Classic win with Galileo Chrome in a behind-closed-doors Leger three years ago – but in his view Desert Hero’s victory in Berkshire three months ago tops the lot.

“I’d be lying if I said anything other than I didn’t even give it a thought beforehand, as a jockey you don’t. There’s only one thing that matters and that’s winning and everything else pales into insignificance unless you win,” he said.

“It was an absolutely incredible day and an extremely special one that will probably rank up right up there for the rest of my days riding.

“Honestly, it’s probably the highest. Obviously you’ll have higher profile wins in higher grade races, but as an Englishman the opportunity to ride the King’s first Royal Ascot winner, with them there and seeing the excitement and the pleasure both the King and Queen got from it, was incredible.”

The King and Queen cheer on Desert Hero at Royal Ascot
The King and Queen cheer on Desert Hero at Royal Ascot (Jonathan Brady/PA)

Following the late Queen’s death 12 months ago, there were genuine concerns the royal patronage of the sport might fade. Marquand feels Desert Hero’s Ascot win went some way to allaying those fears.

“For racing it’s extremely important and gratifying that the passion for the sport that we all love so much is there,” he continued.

“I think that’s what made the occasion so special, that it was so clear for everyone that was there and watching on the TV as well the joy the King and Queen got from that winner.

“I didn’t think that I’d get a Classic-winning opportunity for them so soon after obviously, but that Royal Ascot will be hard to topple off top spot.

“It was great, but to have that line of progression from Desert Hero to the point where he’s going into the St Leger as one of the main chances in the race is fantastic for everyone.”

Given the expectation, Marquand will have plenty of pressure on his shoulders when he heads out onto the Doncaster turf on Saturday afternoon, but he is keen to treat it like just another race.

He said: “I’m looking forward to it, it’s a big day and an important one with pretty special circumstances, obviously. It’s great.

“Obviously we’re very appreciative to be in the situation we are going into the weekend with him, but we kind of put that to one side going into the racing scenario as it’s all insignificant unless his head lands in front in the right place.

“It doesn’t matter who owns him or who is involved or whatever if that doesn’t happen, so first and foremost the main priority is to give him the best opportunity to win that we can and after that hopefully we’ll have a bit more to worry about!

“It’s all insignificant if he doesn’t win, so there’s not much point spending time thinking about it.”

Desert Hero with connections at Royal Ascot
Desert Hero with connections at Royal Ascot (John Walton/PA)

Desert Hero finished only eighth when favourite for Newbury’s London Gold Cup on his seasonal debut, but Marquand insists he was far from despondent.

He said: “He didn’t disappoint us all at Newbury. It was a mile and a quarter, it was obviously his first run of the year and things didn’t quite go to plan as I ended up making the running, so I actually came back in extremely happy with him.

“I just thought he’d been a bit slow and he’d love going up to a mile and a half and the progression from there has been massive.

“Ascot was obviously a huge performance, but he went and cemented that at Goodwood up in Stakes company and on very different ground as well.”

One question Desert Hero will have to answer is whether his stamina will last out over a mile and three-quarters, but Marquand is as hopeful as he can be the longer trip will not be an issue.

“He’s shown how appliable he is to different things and different conditions. He’s got a different trip to contend with this time, but I think it’s fair to say he’s shown the trip shouldn’t be an issue and on breeding it shouldn’t be an issue, so we’re hoping it’s not going to be,” he added.

“Until you run over it, it’s still a question mark, but I think it’s one of the question marks going into a race like this you don’t mind having. If the trip is the only problem we have then fantastic!”

Marquand knows Desert Hero will not have things all his own way, with a clutch of talented rivals lying in wait.

Frankie Dettori bids for one final Classic win before his retirement aboard Arrest, while Continuous and Gregory renew rivalry after finishing first and third in the Great Voltigeur at York last month.

Desert Hero (left) winning at Goodwood
Desert Hero (left) winning at Goodwood (Andrew Matthews/PA)

Further strength in depth is added by the supplemented Middle Earth and Chesspiece, who was only a neck behind Desert Hero at Goodwood in early August.

Assessing the field, Marquand said: “It’s a race where there’s a lot of strength in it, but there’s no standout horse that needs to disappoint for something else to win. It makes it interesting.

“I’m looking forward to the opportunity and I know William and the team at Somerville Lodge are thrilled they’ve found a horse like him this year for the King and Queen – it’s given everyone a huge amount of pleasure to be in this position.

“Whatever happens, they’ve done a fantastic job with him and everyone has enjoyed the ride so far.”

Naqeeb goes some way to upholding family honour

William Haggas heaped praise on stable jockey Tom Marquand after the pair combined to win both of the major handicaps on Betfair Sprint Cup day at Haydock.

The Newmarket handler is a rare visitor to the Merseyside venue, so the fact he decided to make the journey north for the biggest day of the track’s Flat season was noteworthy.

His representative in the first of two £100,000 contests on the card was the impeccably-bred Naqeeb (5-2), who produced a battling display in the Get Daily Rewards With Betfair Handicap.

The son of Nathaniel is a half-brother to the trainer’s former stable star Baaeed and the top-class middle-distance performer Hukum, last seen winning the King George at Ascot in July.

Naqeeb will have to go some to scale those heights, but having opened his account with a wide-margin novice win at Kempton last month, he dug deep on his first start over a mile and three-quarters to score by a length and a quarter from Blindedbythelights.

“I thought a mark of 100 was steep for him, but I think he’s improved a bit for going up in trip and I think he’ll be a good stayer next year,” said Haggas.

“He took a while to win. He got mugged by Middle Earth I thought at Newmarket and now look at Middle Earth, who looks to have a likely chance in the St Leger.

“He’s not as quick as Baaeed – I think he wants another mile! How far he’ll go I don’t know, but he’s a big, raw horse whose still got lots to learn and if he can can end up half as good as those two (Baaeed and Hukum) that’ll do me.”

Haggas and Marquand were soon on the mark again, with Post Impressionist (10-1) coming from the clouds to lift the Betfair Exchange Old Borough Cup.

Caius Chorister looked home for all money after moving smoothly to the lead, but Post Impressionist – who had hinted at a return to form when not beaten far in the Ebor at York last month – flew home from the rear to land the spoils.

Haggas added: “Tom said he didn’t want to go early and I was hoping if that was the case they’d go fast and they seemed to do just that. It’s a long way up the straight when they go hard and thankfully he managed to pick them off.

“The first race of any description he’s run properly this year was in the Ebor last time. There was just a glimpse there and we’re delighted he’s come good today.”

Of Marquand, he said: “I’m really sick of saying it, but he’s a top-class rider and a great fellow. He is really hungry, really keen and really strong.

“I don’t know why he doesn’t have six favourites a day like (William) Buick and (Oisin) Murphy have, but Tom will get there eventually – he’s a young guy.

“He rode his 1,000th winner (in Britain) the other day and all I can guarantee you is it won’t take him that long to ride another 1,000.”

The high-class Chindit (5-2) dominated his rivals in the Group Three Best Odds On The Betfair Exchange Superior Mile.

Runner-up to Modern Games in the Lockinge at Newbury, Richard Hannon’s charge was upstaged by stablemate The Witch Hunter when favourite for last month’s Hungerford Stakes but showed his true colours this time, passing the post just over two lengths ahead of Light Infantry.

“He didn’t run his race last time at Newbury and he was a bit disappointing, but he was right back to his best and he looked like the Group One horse that I think he is,” said Hannon.

“Mr Poonawalla purchased him to see his mares once he retires from racing and he has now won a Group race at two, three, four and five. He looks right back to his very best form.

“We will certainly look at some nice pots abroad now where there is fast ground. There are a couple of races in Australia and races around two bends over a mile in America and he might even be the sort of horse that gets an invite to Hong Kong.”

Chindit’s rider James Doyle doubled up aboard Mick Appleby’s 4-1 shot Raasel in the Betfair Be Friendly Handicap, while the Listed Betfair Daily Tips On Betting.Betfair Ascendant Stakes went to the Roger Varian-trained Al Musmak.

Successful on his Ascot debut before finding only the exciting Rosallion too strong in a Listed contest on King George day, the 11-4 chance got back on the winning trail with a clear-cut victory over 6-4 favourite Macduff.

Winning jockey Ben Curtis said: “He relaxed lovely down the back and I was just keen not to give them too much rope as they can get away from you here.

“He travelled into it nice and when I gave him one flick he responded and went to the front and saw out the mile well, so I’m very pleased with him.

“He floated across the ground and hopefully he’ll take another step forward after that.”

Doom and gloom for favourite backers as 1-25 shot turned over

William Haggas’ Doom became the shortest-priced loser since 1948 when beaten at 1-25 by Karmology in a two-runner race at Ripon.

Doom looked to have been found a great opening in the William Hill Ripon Champion Bonus 2023 Maiden Fillies’ Stakes, her fifth career outing after a juvenile season that saw her finish second to subsequent Oaks winner Soul Sister last autumn.

She had scared off all bar Karl Burke’s unraced Golden Horn filly Karmology, who was ridden by Pierre-Louis Jamin.

At the furlong marker of the one-mile affair victory seemed to be assured for Tom Marquand and Doom, but Karmology began to gain on her outside and streaked past her with half a furlong to run to cross the line a length ahead.

Doom now joins Royal Forest as the shortest-priced loser in British history, the latter being sent off at the same odds of 1-25 for Clarence House Stakes at Ascot in September 1948.

Burke told Sky Sports Racing: “She’s a nice filly but she’s a work in progress, very much one for next year over a longer trip.

“I really only entered her for the race because it was on our doorstep and there wasn’t many entries.

“I said to the owners there were no races over a mile and a quarter for her until the end of the month so we may as well run for the education.

“I think all the Newmarket trainers, apart from William, must have had a late night and never followed the (declaration) tracking so it worked out really well.”

Other prohibitively priced losers in recent years include Tree Of Liberty, beaten at 1-20 in a novice chase at Ludlow in 2018 and Broadspear, who was second at 1-16 at Chepstow last year.

Five Towns brings up landmark winner for Marquand

Tom Marquand brought up his 1,000th winner in Britain aboard Five Towns at Windsor on Monday evening.

The 25-year-old, who has built up a reputation for being one of the best jockeys around, had already reached that figure in Britain and Ireland but has now reached the milestone on home soil having successfully linked up with a filly appropriately trained by his boss, William Haggas.

Marquand began his career with Richard Hannon in 2014 and only a year later was crowned champion apprentice at the tender age of 18.

His first Group-level success came in 2017 when Anna Nerium landed Salisbury’s Dick Poole Stakes, but he would have to wait until 2020 for his first Group One victory which fittingly came in Australia where Marquand spent plenty of his time honing his craft.

He earned the moniker ‘Aussie Tom’ for his exploits in the Southern Hemisphere and partnered the Haggas-trained Addeybb to three big-race victories in Australia before also combining for Champion Stakes glory at Ascot in 2020.

That triumph came shortly after Marquand landed his first Classic success, as he proved an able late deputy aboard Joseph O’Brien’s Galileo Chrome in the St Leger at Doncaster.

Earlier this year he wrote himself into the Royal Ascot history books when steering Haggas’ Desert Hero to win the King George V Stakes. It was the first time the King and Queen’s colours had been carried to victory at the Royal meeting since the death of the late Queen.

Marquand married fellow jockey Hollie Doyle in 2022, with the pair sitting second and third respectively behind William Buick in this season’s jockeys’ championship.

“It’s fantastic,” Marquand told Sky Sports Racing.

“It takes a lot of horses and lot of people to ride 1,000 winners, so I’m very fortunate to have had that support.”

Desperate Hero delights Channons with Newbury win

Desperate Hero benefitted from a positive ride from Tom Marquand when running out a ready winner of the Highclere Castle Gin Handicap at Newbury.

Despite being 6lb above his last winning mark, the Jack Channon-trained grey had the race sewn up at halfway.

He was a little unlucky at Goodwood last time out when drawn on the wrong side, but Marquand made sure there were no excuses this time on the 4-1 chance.

Big smiles from the Desperate Hero team
Big smiles from the Desperate Hero team (PA)

Jack Channon said: “The horses are running well and in great form. He was chinned in a Racing League at Yarmouth, but today Tom said that after two strides he had won.

“The stallion (Captain Gerrard) put a lot of speed into him. He’s a lovely horse to have around.”

Mick Channon said: “Peter (Taplin, owner) and me grew up together and bred this horse who is a smasher.

“He ran a belter when drawn on the wrong side at Goodwood and has run well throughout the year.”

George Boughey’s Spangled Mac (15-2) came from almost last under William Buick to win the Heart Bingo Summer Sizzler Handicap, displaying a smart turn of foot.

William Buick with Spangled Mac
William Buick with Spangled Mac (PA)

Assistant trainer Henry Morshead said: “He’s a great fun horse to have and seven furlongs is perfect for him.

“It was a fabulous ride by Will to bring him through the eye of a needle and finish off so well.”

Roger Teal looks to have a nice prospect on his hands in the shape of Dancing Gemini (11-2) who wore down Fire Demon late on in the Chapel Down British EBF Maiden Stakes.

Dancing Gemini (right) strides out to win under Lewis Edmunds
Dancing Gemini (right) strides out to win under Lewis Edmunds (Andrew Matthews/PA)

“First time out he was backed from 20-1 down to 5-2 but was too green to do himself justice,” said Teal.

“Then he ran into a good one at Ascot (Richard Hannon’s Rosallion).

“He’s proved today that he’s a good horse to go forward with.

“I’ll let the dust settle and might run him once or twice more, no more than that as he’s a good prospect.”

The Charlie Fellowes-trained El Jasor (11-2) burst impressively clear to win the Brian Rycraft Memorial Handicap under Jamie Spencer.

“I think the step up to a mile and a half has helped him. He’s still a bit of a baby, but the ground suited us well. He’s a horse that needs to be on the pace as he does tend to just gallop, but Jamie said the more he got at him the more he found,” said Fellowes’ assistant Mike Marshall.

Tom Marquand reflects on stellar Goodwood week

Tom Marquand reflected on a thoroughly satisfactory Qatar Goodwood Festival that saw him pick up not only the top jockey title but all the riding accolades.

The rider ended the week with four victories to his credit, all of which demonstrated his undeniable range of skill in the saddle.

While Hamish’s win in Friday’s Glorious Stakes was a pretty straightforward affair, Marquand twice exhibited his excellent front-running abilities, first stealing the march on Quickthorn’s rivals in Tuesday’s Group One Goodwood Cup – a trick he repeated on Saturday aboard Sumo Sam in the Lillie Langtry Stakes.

In contrast, Desert Hero had to be delivered with precision timing in Thursday’s Gordon Stakes, prevailing by just a neck to cement his St Leger claims and raise hopes of a Classic winner for owners the King and Queen.

Marquand admitted there was only ever one set of tactics with Quickthorn, but was delighted to be able to show the full range of his powers in the saddle.

He said: “Obviously with Quickthorn it was plan A – and plan A only – and I was always going to do it, and everybody knew I was going to do it.

“It was pretty special and to do that in a Group One, as a jockey I’m always conscious that you don’t want to fall into that lull of if you’re riding 140/150 horses a month, you can very easily just sort of go into an autonomous routine and you go out, you get on, you canter down, you jump out the stalls, and you can end up riding without any flair or passion.

“And I think it’s important to make sure that you ride like you enjoy it, because you do enjoy it.

“Quickthorn showcased that and then being able to go opposite and ride with a bit of playfulness in the opposite regard on Desert Hero the next day, it makes it fun as a jockey.

“I know that ultimately you have one job and that is to win and get it done, but sometimes by making sure you’re enjoying it, it can actually be the way to ride best.”

Marquand spent his formative years with the Hannon team in Wiltshire and admitted the yard’s success over the years at the meeting put an extra shine on taking the leading jockey honours.

He added: “It’s great. It’s been a good week. Coming to big meetings, you walk away with one winner and when you start that’s obviously a big deal. But the further you go through your career, you want to put your name on the placard. It’s great.

“I grew up at Hannon’s as an apprentice and Goodwood was a big, big deal. You only have to look at the table on the wall to see how many times Richard Hannon senior won it, and obviously Richard junior after, so it’s always been something you would have your eyes on from when you are an apprentice, so it’s great, it’s nice.”

Ralph Beckett came out on top in the trainers’ division, sending out three winners including the King and Queen’s Serried Ranks on Friday and Lennox Stakes hero Kinross, who was one of two winners for Frankie Dettori at his final Goodwood Festival.

Beckett said: “I am amazed, what a lovely surprise!

“It has been a very satisfying week, I have really enjoyed it and am delighted with how the horses have been running. There were too many seconds, but that is the nature of it!

“Kinross’ win in the Lennox Stakes is the obvious highlight, but also the double yesterday was pretty special.

“Classical Song’s second on debut in the maiden fillies’ race was a pleasing run, and Balance Play’s win in the handicap yesterday was a long-held plan.”

Sumo Sam springs Lillie Langtry shock

Tom Marquand excelled from the front at Goodwood as Sumo Sam ran her rivals ragged to win the Qatar Lillie Langtry Stakes.

Having stolen a decisive advantage on Quickthorn in the Group One Goodwood Cup earlier in the week, Marquand was again allowed to do his own thing on a stayer.

He bounced straight into an early lead on Paul and Oliver Cole’s filly, and in a race run in very testing conditions, he never looked like being caught at any stage.

Frankie Dettori briefly looked a threat on Free Wind who moved into contention on the bridle, however, as soon as Dettori asked his mount for an effort, she floundered in the heavy ground.

Sumo Sam (25-1) was allowed to come home unchallenged, with River Of Stars staying on from the rear to claim second, some eight and a half lengths away, with a further five and a half lengths back to Time Lock in third.

Marquand was a late jockey booking and Oliver Cole said: “Tom’s given her a brilliant ride and she’s a very good filly.

“Out in front like that, she was not going to be pegged back. It’s great for the old man and Sir Martyn (Arbib) as they have been together so long.

“I’m not sure what we’ll do next, she’d have a penalty in the Park Hill. She’s got the class to run in a Cup race but she’s got to have her conditions.”

Cole added: “We’ve done a lot of stalls work with her since her last run – she’s gone in twice a week. In her last two races she’s been left and that hasn’t been helpful. She takes a lot of pushing in and a lot of cajoling, and the stalls handlers make it look so easy. We’re always standing a few lengths behind because we don’t want to get booted!

“Full credit to the team at home, and thanks very much to the guys at the stalls who are the unsung heroes. They do what a lot of us wouldn’t do, so full credit to them. Also to the boys who have ridden her in the stalls at home, because I know I wouldn’t ride her.

“I was as confident as you can be with the ground because you never know how they will go through it, but she’s gone through it like a really, really good horse. Someone said to me a few weeks ago if you want to get the best out of that horse leave her until next year, so this just shows you have to persist with horses. They are not there to be decorations.”

Sumo Sam loved the soft ground
Sumo Sam loved the soft ground (PA)

Marquand was thrilled to secure a winning ride and said: “I’d be lying if I said I did any research into the race.

“I came back in from the last race and they said ‘can you do 8st 11lb?’ so I jumped aboard. I’ve seen plenty of her and was due to ride her on the day I got kicked at the Guineas weekend. I watched her go and finish second and it looked like she wanted a trip.

“Mr Cole and Olly were keen to go and make it a solid test, and as the other day showed if you find a rhythm in front it’s a hard track to get horses back. She’s done well, and while she was getting tired in the last half furlong the damage was already done.”

Ralph Beckett could also look towards the Park Hill at Doncaster’s St Leger meeting after a satisfactory effort on conditions that did not suit.

He said: “She stumbled coming out of the stalls but I’m not sure it made any difference as she was always scrambling on that ground. She has a German dam-side to her pedigree but I have always felt that she is a good, little fast-ground filly.

Ralph Beckett felt the ground was against River Of Stars
Ralph Beckett felt the ground was against River Of Stars (John Walton/PA)

“She has probably run above herself. She was having to check herself to find her feet all the time.

“I would say the Park Hill next, or something like that. She didn’t run very well in it last year but she is a hardier, more finished article this time.”

Dettori felt a combination of conceding weight and deep ground had anchored Free Wind.

He said: “(Carrying) 10st when the ground is this bad is like carrying double. I was giving a stone away to the winner and just couldn’t carry the weight. These conditions are very difficult.”

Hamish produces glorious performance for Goodwood honours

The redoubtable Hamish bagged his sixth win at Group Three level in the l’Ormarins King’s Plate Glorious Stakes at Goodwood.

The lightly-raced seven-year-old had won eight of his 16 previous starts in all, most recently pipping Scriptwriter to success in the John Smith’s Silver Cup at York three weeks ago.

Trainer William Haggas declared Hamish for a stellar renewal of the King George at Ascot last weekend, but fast ground scuppered his participation and he instead arrived at Goodwood as a 5-6 favourite in the hands of Tom Marquand.

Hamish and Tom Marquand after winning at Goodwood
Hamish and Tom Marquand after winning at Goodwood (Molly Hunter/PA)

Ridden patiently in midfield for much of the mile-and-a-half-contest, the son of Motivator – who is owned by the trainer’s father, Brian – burst into it late before powering to a four-length verdict over Jack Darcy, with the winner’s stablemate, Candleford, best of the rest in third.

Haggas said: “The horse has been an absolute nightmare today to saddle. Poor Maureen (wife) has been jumped on about eight times, she’s got blood coming out of the top of her head because the horse struck her, but she adores this horse and she does everything with him. I’m taking no credit myself, the credit and the praise should go to her.

“I rang my father, who is a very proud Yorkshireman, and said ‘he’s been a bloody nightmare today, when he’s like this he never runs his best’, and he said ‘I think he’s like the north!’.

“He’s quite good at York, the horse, so he’s probably right.”

He went on: “I didn’t think this was a strong race for the grade and he was always travelling well. Tom said after the race this was the best the horse has felt this year. He scrambled home a bit at York last time, and while he likes a bit of cut in the ground he likes it wet.

“He won and poor Candleford was cantering, but got lost in the ground – it’s too tacky for him. He wants top of the ground. Candleford ran a good race, but Hamish was better.

“He won’t run in the Ebor. He’s hard to place, and while people said I should have run him in the King George I couldn’t do that on drying ground. You can run in a race like this on drying ground, but the King George is a different thing. My father quickly pointed out he has only run against one of this year’s King George horses, and that was Hukum and he beat him (in the September Stakes at Kempton in 2021)! He was lambasting me for not running.

“The Irish St Leger is a possibility, but he wants soft ground. We’ve been lucky this summer – ha, ha, what summer? – that we’ve had some soft ground. He’s run twice in a fortnight, while last year we couldn’t get anything out of him at all.”

The King and Queen will have a St Leger runner
The King and Queen will have a St Leger runner (David Davies/PA)

Hamish was making it a good two days for the Haggas team, after the King and Queen’s Desert Hero booked his St Leger ticket with victory on Thursday.

Confirming Doncaster for the world’s oldest Classic as the plan, Haggas said: “He’s in the Voltigeur, but doesn’t need to run there, so all being well he will go straight to the Leger. I think we ought to try it because there’s plenty of stamina on the dam’s side and he’s by Sea The Stars, a very versatile stallion.

“He has a chance of getting the trip. Gregory will be hard to beat, but we will give it a go.”

Desert Hero raises hopes of Classic glory for the King and Queen

Desert Hero emerged as a genuine Classic prospect for the King and Queen as he followed up his famous Royal Ascot success by landing the John Pearce Racing Gordon Stakes at Goodwood.

The William Haggas-trained three-year-old raised the roof when carrying the royal silks to victory in the King George V Stakes, providing the King and Queen with their first winner at the showpiece meeting.

He had more to do stepping up to Group Three level, but proved up to the task under a typically well-judged ride from Tom Marquand.

Desert Hero returns to the Goodwood winner's enclosure
Desert Hero returns to the Goodwood winner’s enclosure (Molly Hunter/PA)

A field of six runners set out to tackle the mile-and-a-half contest, with James Doyle intent on making every yard of the running aboard Chesspiece.

One by one his challengers came and went, but Marquand always looked confident in behind and after negotiating his way out of a pocket, Desert Hero powered home to get up and score by a neck.

The winner was cut to 6-1 from 16-1 by Betfair for the St Leger at Doncaster in September, a race the late Queen won in her Silver Jubilee year of 1977 with Dunfermline.

John Warren, racing manager for the winning owners, said: “This horse is so committed and brave. We don’t know if he will stay a mile and three-quarters yet, he’ll have to tell us whether he does. I’ll chat with William, who couldn’t be here today, but I wouldn’t be surprised if they want to roll the dice and give it a go (the St Leger).

“Tom just said the horse is such a remarkable animal, he said he felt confident all the way through the race because the horse just wants to please. He’s a genuine horse, we’ve seen a lot of horses for a long time and there are very few horses who really have the brain and will to win and this horse really is a pleaser. He really wants to win and that is fantastic.

“William was pretty confident that if he could cope with the ground, then he was a horse who had made progress. I don’t know how you calculate the progress, but he thought he had really come on and he was physically maturing.

“Horses that are bred the way he is are the ones that actually can improve. They can come to their own in their career, this is the moment where they can make a move up the ranks.”

Maureen Haggas, assistant to her husband, said: “It wasn’t the easiest watch, but Tom said he always thought he was going to win.

“The important thing with this horse is getting him switched off early, which he did really well, and I think if you can do that you can let the rest of the race unfold. He’s got guts. He wants to win and that counts for a lot.

“Yes, he could go further. The obvious aim would be the St Leger, I suppose, and I think, with all these things, you never really know until you run in the race. We thought Storm The Stars would stay all day and he didn’t quite get home in the St Leger, so you never really know until you try, but there’s no reason not to try, is there?”

Asked about the Melbourne Cup, she replied: “I know three-year-olds have done it, but it’s quite hard for a three-year-old, especially at the end of a fairly busy season. He’s come to two festivals and run his guts out. It’s quite a big ask, I think.

“We are so lucky to be training for the King and Queen and to have a horse as good as this, and I am sure they will be enjoying it and good luck to them.”

Simon Crisford was delighted with the performance of Gordon Stakes runner-up Chesspiece
Simon Crisford was delighted with the performance of Gordon Stakes runner-up Chesspiece (Simon Cooper/PA)

Connections of the runner-up Chesspiece are also keen to target the St Leger, while James Ferguson, trainer of the third-placed Canberra Legend, is eyeing the Great Voltigeur at York.

Simon Crisford, who trains Chesspiece in partnership with his son Ed, said: “We just got outpaced at a crucial moment. He wants a mile and three-quarters but he ran his heart out – fantastic.

“The St Leger dream is still alive.”

Ferguson said: “I was very pleased with the run. Most importantly I thought it’s the first time he’s got all the preliminaries bang on. He’s really, really grown up and mentally matured.

“He handled the occasion, handled the step up in trip no problem and has certainly run a career-best.

“If he is OK we will go back to York for the Great Voltigeur.”

Quickthorn makes all for remarkable Goodwood Cup success

Tom Marquand executed a perfect front-running ride aboard Quickthorn to win the Al Shaqab Goodwood Cup.

Trained by Hughie Morrison, Marquand had adopted very similar tactics last season in the Lonsdale Cup at York when beating the reopposing Coltrane by 14 lengths.

Quickthorn had failed to quite match that level of performance since, but did return to winning ways last time out back at York in a Listed race and the form was subsequently franked when the second, Israr, won a Group Two next time out.

Tom Marquand salutes the Goodwood crowd
Tom Marquand salutes the Goodwood crowd (Andrew Matthews/PA)

Marquand stole a few lengths early and then once again on the brow of the hill, when the field might expect to start making ground, but the jockey ensured there was no let up in the pace.

At one stage he was around 20 lengths clear but Oisin Murphy on Coltrane, who was leading the pack, seemed content in where he was with half a mile to go.

The riders of Eldar Eldarov, Giavellotto, Emily Dickinson and Gold Cup winner Courage Mon Ami all suddenly realised Quickthorn was not stopping, but the victor had a decisive lead.

Quickthorn won by six lengths from Emily Dickinson, who prevailed in a photo for second with Coltrane, with Eldar Eldarov a further short head back in fourth.

“Lady Blyth (owner) has bred a Grade One (over jumps) and a Group One winner, not many people have done that,” said Morrison.

“I was quite excited going up the hill, we saw what he did last year. I’ve always felt he needed a bit of juice in the ground, his autumn flops in the last couple of years are when he’s just gone over the top.

“As you can see, he just puts so much into it that he probably deserves to go over the top some time between now and September.”

When asked if he fancied a crack over hurdles and taking on Constitution Hill Morrison quipped: “I don’t think that would be fair on Constitution Hill!

“He’s just a galloper, he’s fantastic to train. Watching him every morning he just goes like he did to post, like a three-mile chaser, the other horses have to do about three strides to his one.

“We’ll enjoy this a lot. Tom got the fractions fantastically right, as he did at York. Jason (Hart) got them exactly right when he rode him at York and I thank him for giving him such a fantastic ride last time.

“We all know how to ride him to his strengths, he’s a galloper, pure and simple, and we’re very lucky to have him.”

Marquand said: “It was a fantastic performance and he’s a fun horse to ride. He goes out wearing his heart on his sleeve, you know that everybody knows what you’re going to do and they’ve got to try and stop you almost.

“That was a huge thrill. All credit to Hughie Morrison and the team at home for keeping him right, and Lord and Lady Blyth – it’s fantastic. He’s had some great days, but he deserved a Group One and it would have felt wrong if he had never got one.”

On whether it was the plan to go that far clear, he added: “It’s a case of going and finding a rhythm and wherever that puts you, it puts you. Obviously we showed that in the Lonsdale Cup last year and it just feels like the right way to ride him. Thankfully I got it right today.

“Once I lit him up at the three pole, it was evident that we were going to get home – it was just whether something would have exceptional ability to come and catch him. It’s a nice feeling to go to that sort of race with that amount of stamina underneath you. Big performance.”

Quickthorn had them all strung out behind him
Quickthorn had them all strung out behind him (Andrew Matthews/PA)

Murphy said of Coltrane: “It was obvious in the first furlong that Lone Eagle, Tashkhan and Broome – those horses you’d expect to go forward – weren’t going forward, so I changed my plan and decided to let Coltrane roll down to the first turn.

“I thought Tom was very clever – round those sharp bends, he allowed Quickthorn to really slip on. You can only go so fast around those turns, because they are quite sharp, and by the time we turned to go back uphill, he had a sizeable advantage.

“He (Quickthorn) had to use up a fair bit of energy albeit basically going downhill to get away from us. But often you pay for that sort of ride and in the last furlong I wasn’t sure if he (Quickthorn) would stop completely, but I probably cost myself second position by trying to close the gap from three down.

“Quickthorn has a massive pair of lungs and covers so much ground, so he has enough pace to get away from a high-class field. I was aware of what could happen, and he was still able to do it.”

Relief Rally powers to Super Sprint glory

Relief Rally sent the large Newbury crowd home happy when justifying favouritism in the featured Weatherbys Super Sprint Stakes.

Tom Marquand’s mount was drawn near the stands’ rail and had to race alone for much of the last furlong and a half as the filly attempted to reel in those who had a clear advantage up the middle and towards the far rail.

To her credit, the evens favourite scythed through the good to soft ground and having collared long-time leader Dapperling (33-1) inside the final furlong, drew readily clear for a three-length success.

It was just compensation for Marquand and trainer William Haggas, who saw the daughter of Kodiac touched off by American raider Crimson Advocate in the Queen Mary Stakes at Royal Ascot.

Haggas said: “She was in front before the line and after the line, but not on the line at Ascot. She ran a good race there. She is a pretty good filly.

“I don’t know where the second on the stands’ side finished, but she won easy and when he asked her, she picked up well.”

Marquand admitted he had plenty of ground to make up in the second part of the valuable five-furlong contest, which was worth just shy of £123,000 to the winner.

Yet he felt confident the Simon Munir and Isaac Souede-owned juvenile would reel in the leaders.

“To be honest, I was getting towed as far as I could while being happy, but whilst never worried that the other side had a bit of an advantage on us.

“I was lucky enough to be on her at Ascot, so I know the turn of foot she has.

“I was confident that this ground was even more to her liking. It was as straightforward as you would have hoped it would be, but it doesn’t always prove straightforward.

“The other side did have a march on, but she is a very good filly and thankfully she has had a decent day in the sun now and I’m sure she will have a few more.”

He added: “She is every bit as exciting as you’d want her to look for the future and I think my heart is still broken (after Ascot), but it is gluing back together a little bit after that.

“She has done it well. She has got bags of speed, she is super-straightforward, I think she is improving, and I think she improved for having a day like she had at Ascot – she had to race that day and it was obviously a frustrating day, but she will have come on for that and I think she showed that today by the way she just raced on by herself on her side.”

Haggas could swerve York’s Nunthorpe, as he potentially eyes the Prix de l’Abbaye de Longchamp.

When asked of a possible Nunthorpe bid, he said: “I don’t think so – I think the Abbaye, but who knows?

“I think the French race is such a draw race. If you get a low draw, it is such an advantage, whereas the Nunthorpe you can win from anywhere.

“In France, you cannot win wide. If our luck is in at the that time of the year, we will get a low draw. We will see.”

Perotto prevails to seal Marquand double at Sandown

Tom Marquand timed his run to perfection aboard Perotto to claim the Coral Challenge and secure a double on the Coral-Eclipse card at Sandown.

He had been undone when making his move a shade early when 10th of 30 in the Royal Hunt Cup at Ascot 17 days ago, but on this occasion, Marquand’s mount was faultless.

The Roger Varian-trained five-year-old was brought with a decisive effort a furlong out to score by a length and quarter from Ouzo, having had plenty in his favour this time, a fact his rider alluded to.

Marquand said: “I spoke to Roger this morning about the horse and he has a tendency to just be a bit fizzy. They did a bit of work just to get him out the gates at Ascot and he probably broke a little too well and just got left over-racing a touch.

“Today, we had a kind draw, he was racing down into a bend, he had the hood on – everything just pointed in the right direction for him. The plan came easy because he broke nicely and we had that easy tempo early down to the bend.

“They got everything spot on today for him to be able to conserve the energy he needed to get that last couple of furlongs.”

Possible targets include the International Handicap back at Ascot and the Golden Mile.

Marquand added: “I do just wonder about having a bend to race around, because it shuts the race down for him, but I will leave that to Roger to discuss, because he has some solid form at Ascot and if the race is run to suit for him, it is a great place. He had proven he is consistent to a high level and he needs little bits to go his way.”

Pat Dobbs was another who provided a masterclass of jockeyship, timing the run of Classic to perfection to claim the Coral Racing Club Handicap for trainer Richard Hannon.

The Julie Wood-owned three-year-old did not quite live up to expectations in the Greenham, but had run well twice subsequently in handicap company and Dobbs delivered the Dubawi colt in the dying strides to land the seven-furlong heat by a length from Novus.

“He is very tricky at home,” said Dobbs. “He is keen to get on with things and has only just started to settle down.

“He obviously has a very good pedigree so it was important to do it again at three and he is definitely going the right way.

“He had a different bit on today and a cross noseband which was a bit more manageable. He was galloping with his head in the air for the first three furlongs last time. Mentally he is getting better.”

The Ralph Beckett-trained Lord Protector gave Rossa Ryan success when staying on nicely after leading at the furlong pole to down Haunted Dream in the Coral Play ‘Racing-Super-Series’ For Free Handicap Stakes.

Like Tom Marquand, Ryan Moore also recorded a double on the afternoon.

“He’s improving every season”, was Aidan O’Brien’s assessment of the jockey after partnering Paddington to success in the Coral-Eclipse.

Having vanquished the John and Thady Gosden-trained Emily Upjohn, he gave that training duo a measure of compensation when guiding Lisboa to a runaway success in the concluding Coral ‘Get Closer To The Action’ Handicap.

The Galileo colt was making a quick turnaround from a below-par showing at Kempton 10 days ago and equipped with first-time blinkers, was given a positive ride by Moore, who had the nine-furlong contest in hand from the two-furlong pole.

After the runaway success, John Gosden said: “He didn’t pay much attention last time at Kempton, got between horses and decided he wouldn’t be bothered.

“So we popped the blinkers on and he decided to show what talent he has. He was kept in training this year. I thought he might have gone to the sales last year, but he will be in the July Sales next week.

“He flashed ability last year, then we had to pack in with him as he had a bit of an issue with a knee, but that has come absolutely right now – he’s been in good form.

“It is a pleasant surprise, particularly when Ryan goes that pace early on. He got a breather round the bend, but had the ability to still win comfortably. I thought once he got a lead, he wouldn’t be caught.”

He added: “It has been a great day’s racing and a phenomenal Eclipse. It was like an old-fashioned match-race.”